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Cancer patient defends ObamaCare criticism after Dem goes after ad

 

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A Michigan cancer patient is fighting back after her critical claims about ObamaCare were called into question by a Democratic congressman, who went so far as to threaten Michigan television stations running her ad.

Julie Boonstra, who was diagnosed five years ago with leukemia, was featured in an ad last week by the conservative Americans for Prosperity. In it, she said her insurance plan was canceled because of the Affordable Care Act, and claimed her out-of-pocket costs are now “so high it’s unaffordable.”

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EBeauty receives its first grant!

SEI GIVING FUND

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March 28, 2013

EBEAUTY COMMUNITY INC.
C/O CAROLYN KELLER
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To Whom It May Concern,

 
I am pleased to enclose a grant of $1,000.00 to EBEAUTY COMMUNITY INC. from THE ROMEO FAMILY FOUNDATION 0f SEI Giving Fund. This grant is made at the recommendation of MR AND MRS CARMEN V ROMEO. The grant is to be used for .

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Not all cancer survivors “mesmerized” by Lance Armstrong

Oprah says she found Lance Armstrong’s doping confession just mesmerizing: “I think the entire interview was difficult” for the seven-time Tour de France winner, Winfrey told CBS News. After years of denying he ever touched a performance-enhancing drug, the cyclist was “pretty forthcoming” in their 2 1/2-hour chat at the Four Seasons in Austin, she said. “We were mesmerized and riveted by some of his answers.”

Liars can have that effect, of course, and she has a show to promote. But some of us who’ve lost years, friends and body parts to cancer are maybe not quite so fascinated.

Because even after he started cheating in the mid-’90s, Mr. Livestrong had a chance to strike a truly important blow against cancer, which has been linked to both steroids and human growth hormone. Don’t do what I did, he could have said after his diagnosis, and millions would have listened.

Instead, the message he and his tacky plastic bracelets sent around the world was just the opposite: Whatever he was doing, it was clearly worth emulating. Sure, because he was the guy who’d stared down death and ridden off laughing.

Read More at The Washington Post. 

 

“Hobbit” actor Ian McKellen has prostate cancer

“The Hobbit” actor Ian McKellen said in an interview published on Tuesday that he had had prostate cancer for the last six or seven years, but added that the disease was not life-threatening.

McKellen, 73, played Gandalf in the hit “Lord of the Rings” movie trilogy, and reprises the role in three prequels based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s novel “The Hobbit”.

The first of those, “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”, recently had its world premiere in New Zealand, where it was shot under the directorship of Peter Jackson.

“I’ve had prostate cancer for six or seven years,” McKellen told the Daily Mirror tabloid. “When you have got it you monitor it and you have to be careful it doesn’t spread. But if it is contained in the prostate it’s no big deal.”

His representatives in London were not immediately available to comment on the interview.

“Many, many men die from it but it’s one of the cancers that is totally treatable,” added McKellen, one of Britain’s most respected actors who is also well known in Hollywood for appearances in the X-Men franchise.

“I am examined regularly and it’s just contained, it’s not spreading. I’ve not had any treatment.”

Read more at Chicago Tribune. 

An Eagle Kiss

Freedom and I have been together 11 years this summer. 
She came in as a baby in 1998 with two broken wings.
Her left wing doesn’t open all the way even after surgery,
it was broken in 4 places.
She’s my baby.

When Freedom came in she could not stand 
and both wings were broken. She was 
emaciated and covered in lice. We made the 
decision to give her a chance at life, so I took 
her to the vet’s office. From then 
on, I was always around her. We had her in a 
huge dog carrier with the top off, and it 
was loaded up with shredded newspaper for her to 
lay in. I used to sit and talk to her, 
urging her to live, to fight; and she would lay 
there looking at me with those big brown eyes. 
We also had to tube feed her for weeks.

This went on for 4-6 weeks, and by then she still 
couldn’t stand. It got to the point where the 
decision was made to euthanize her 
if she couldn’t stand in a week. You know you don’t 
want to cross that line between torture and 
rehab, and it looked like death was 
winning. She was going to be put 
down that Friday, and I was supposed to come in 
on that Thursday afternoon. I didn’t want to go 
to the center that Thursday, because I couldn’t 
bear the thought of her being euthanized; 
but I went anyway, and when I walked in everyone 
was grinning from ear to ear. I went 
immediately back to her cage; and there she was, 
standing on her own, a big beautiful 
eagle. She was ready to live. I was 
just about in tears by then. That 
was a very good day. 

We knew she could never fly, so the director 
asked me to glove train her.
I got her used to the glove,
and then to jesses, and we started
doing education programs for schools
in western Washington . 
We wound up in the newspapers, 
radio (believe it or not) and some 
TV. Miracle Pets even did a show 
about us.

In the spring of 2000, I was diagnosed with 
non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. I had stage 3, 
which is not good (one major organ plus 
everywhere), so I wound up doing 8 months of 
chemo. Lost the hair – the whole 
bit. I missed a lot of work. When I 
felt good enough, I would go to Sarvey 
and take Freedom out for walks. Freedom would 
also come to me in my dreams and help me fight 
the cancer. This happened time and time again.

Fast forward to November 2000

the day after Thanksgiving,
I went in for my last checkup. 
I was told that if the cancer was not 
all gone after 8 rounds of chemo, then my last 
option was a stem cell transplant. A anyway, they 
did the tests; and I had to come back Monday for 
the results. I went in Monday, and I was 
told that all the cancer was gone.

So the first thing I did was get up to Sarvey and 
take the big girl out for a walk. It was misty
and cold. I went to her flight and jessed her 
up, and we went out front to the top of the 
hill. I hadn’t said a word to 
Freedom, but somehow she knew. She looked at me 
and wrapped both
her wings around me to where I 
could feel them pressing in on my back 
(I was engulfed in eagle wings), and she 
touched my nose with her beak and stared into my 
eyes, and we just stood there like that 
for I don’t know how long . That was a 
magic moment. We have been soul mates ever 
since she came in. This is a very special bird.

On a side note: I have had people who 
were sick come up to us when we are out, and 
Freedom has some kind of hold on 
them. I once had a guy who was 
terminal come up to us and
I let him hold her.
His knees just about buckled and he 
swore he could feel her power course through his 
body. I have so many stories like that..

I never forget the honor I have of being so close 
to such a magnificent spirit as 
Freedom.

-Jeff Guidry

Study Divides Breast Cancer Into Four Distinct Types

In findings that are fundamentally reshaping the scientific understanding of breast cancer, researchers have identified four genetically distinct types of the cancer. And within those types, they found hallmark genetic changes that are driving many cancers.

Elizabeth Stark, a patient of Dr. Ellis, with her family in St. Louis on Friday, said she was hopeful about future treatments.

These discoveries, published online on Sunday in the journal Nature, are expected to lead to new treatments with drugs already approved for cancers in other parts of the body and new ideas for more precise treatments aimed at genetic aberrations that now have no known treatment.

The study is the first comprehensive genetic analysis of breast cancer, which kills more than 35,000 women a year in the United States. The new paper, and several smaller recent studies, are electrifying the field.

“This is the road map for how we might cure breast cancer in the future,” said Dr. Matthew Ellis of Washington University, a researcher for the study.

Researchers and patient advocates caution that it will still take years to translate the new insights into transformative new treatments. Even within the four major types of breast cancer, individual tumors appear to be driven by their own sets of genetic changes. A wide variety of drugs will most likely need to be developed to tailor medicines to individual tumors.

Read More at The New York Times.

MD Anderson Cancer Center Plans ‘Moon Shot’ for Cures

The MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston announced Friday it’s mounting a bold “moon shot” to dramatically reduce deaths from eight types of cancer within the next decade.

The new effort was likened to the space program of the 1960s, inspired by John F. Kennedy’s famous speech, 50 years ago this month at Rice University in Houston, in which he said America should go to the moon and do other things, “not because they are easy but because they are hard.”

“When Kennedy stood up there on September 1962, he didn’t say that we’re going to study how to get to the moon,” said Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson. “He said we are going to the moon. Then the nation rallied to make sure we went to the moon.”

The program, set to launch February 2013, will aim to accelerate the time cancer prevention and treatment efforts proven by research are used clinically. It is considered by the hospital as its largest initiative to eliminate some forms of cancer.

“They’re bringing the lab to the clinic,” said Dr. Roy Herbst, director of the thoracic oncology research program at the Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center. “You would say that they’re doing this anyhow, but they’re refocusing.”

Herbst was a former faculty member at MD Anderson but is not affiliated with its moon shot program.

The program comes after a year-long review process by a panel of medical experts from across the nation. They argued that as a result of work done over the last decade, researchers are close to finding cures for some types of cancer.

Read More at ABC NEWS.

Cancer surpasses heart disease as Hispanics’ leading cause of death

Cancer has overtaken heart disease as the No. 1 killer among Hispanics in the U.S., and the rest of the country may be only a few years behind.

The change is not exactly cause for alarm. Death rates for both cancer and heart disease have been dropping for Hispanics and everyone else. It’s just that heart disease deaths have fallen faster, largely because of improved treatment and prevention, including the development of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Overall, cancer will probably replace heart disease as the nation’s top cause of death in the next 10 years, said Rebecca Siegel of the American Cancer Society, lead author of a study reporting the new findings. Government health statisticians think the crossover point could be reached as early as this year, or at least in the next two or three years.

The reason it has already happened among Hispanics is that they are younger on average than non-Hispanic whites and blacks. And cancer tends to kill people earlier in life than heart disease, for decades the nation’s top cause of death.

The shift could bring about a change in disease-prevention efforts, government spending priorities and people’s attitudes.

“We’ve been so focused on heart disease mortality for so long. … This may change the way people look at their risk,” said Robert Anderson, who oversees the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control branch that monitors death statistics.

Read More at CBS NEWS.

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